Author Archives: Nicola

Returning to riding after bub

Melinda Allen

Melinda Allen

Last year I wrote a post about riding while pregnant and I thought I should follow that up with one about returning to riding after giving birth. The most important thing to note is that every women is different and so everyone needs to make their own decisions about how much to cycle during pregnancy and after having a baby.

For the record, this is not a topic that I’m an expert on, because I have not completed any formal training in healthcare or fitness, and I’ve never been pregnant, but I’ve done some research and asked a number of women who have experienced it firsthand for their input.

When to start again?

Some of the women said they were back riding as early as two weeks but it also depended on the type of delivery. Alison Frendin in her article about returning to riding after baby points out that every woman is different – “natural, C-section, episiotomy or tearing? –Obviously if you had a rough time you aren’t going to be ready at six weeks. Still, stitches should be completely gone and C-section mums must wait double the six week period after having this “major surgery”! Even then, lifting or pulling heavy objects and doing any impact exercises is going to put a strain on your abdomen.”

If you want to read Alison’s entire article you’ll find it here.

Read more

Cyclists beware of angry butcherbirds in Spring

The butcherbird wreaking havoc at Concord West

The butcherbird wreaking havoc at Concord West

Last year I wrote a post about Springtime bird attacks, and either I didn’t heed my own advice or the birds in my area are really bad this year, but last week I was attacked by a very aggressive butcherbird!

For those who don’t know about this little ‘terrier’ of a bird, it’s an Australian native and about half the size of a magpie and usually grey or black & white in colour. Since being attacked by one last week I’ve done a little research on these aggressive little so-and-sos.

As well as having a hook at the end of its beak for stabbing prey (as seen in the photograph), the butcherbird has been described as the Hannibal Lecter of the bird world. It gets its name because it impales its prey on thorns and tree forks. These skewers support victims as they are eaten, or stored for later consumption.

There’s a very aggressive butcherbird frequenting a well-worn cyclist route in my local area, right near Concord West train station and he’s drawn blood on many occasions (I say ‘he’ because it’s usually the male bird who defends the nest, not because I’m being sexist!). He got me from behind last week, clipping me on the chin with a his beak and drawing blood on three separate small cuts. And I’ve spoken to many, many others who’ve suffered the same fate.

Read more

Every woman’s guide to getting started in triathlon: Part 2

Balance babes on bikesHere’s part two of last week’s post on getting started in triathlon. Here, the women of UTS & Balance Tri Club tell us about training and the benefits of joining a tri club…..

 

How do you get around a weakness in one discipline eg. a lot of people seem to struggle in the swim leg? 

For me, the run is my weakness, so I tend to work a bit harder at that.  If you struggle in one area, I would recommend some specialist coaching to give you some tailored tips as to what to work on so that you’re not ‘training the same mistakes’, and then work a bit harder at your weakness – but certainly don’t abandon your strengths!  Triathlon is a multi-sport activity, so make sure you work at all three – Jocie Evison

Don’t be afraid to ask for help – all local pools offer adult learn to swim classes – it is never too late to learn so don’t let that stop you. You should work a little harder on your weak leg, but usually people don’t do that! Try and have a positive attitude towards it. For example, I used to hate the bike, and I always said it “I hate the bike! I hate hills!” Surprisingly I didn’t get any better at it. But as soon as I made the decision to love the bike and be positive, everything got easier & I got better at it! – Sarah Koen

Read more

Every woman’s guide to getting started in triathlon: Part 1

Balance babes transition croppedThe sport of triathlon continues to grow in popularity and one of the things I’ve noticed is that women and men are signing up in equal numbers to test themselves in this challenging three discipline sport. I do confess to not knowing a great deal about triathlon (despite completing four Pink Triathlons) so I asked the women of Balance UTS Tri club for their advice on how to get started. Several of them responded and I’ve compiled their answers below. Stay tuned for Part 2 next week……….

 

What advice can you give to women who are just starting out in triathlon?

I think often as women we are really hard on ourselves in general. Men will often just “give something a crack” without necessarily knowing 100% whether they can do it and I don’t know that women will throw themselves into things with the same careless abandon! I would encourage any women thinking about wanting to start out in triathlons – “give it a go!” Don’t worry about whether you’re fit enough or whether you have the right gear or if you’re going to get the transitions right etc. I did my first race with a pair of old swimmers, my bike that was almost 10 years old and worn out pair of runners and put my helmet on backwards :) 2 years later I’m loving racing, have done lots of different distances and know how to put my helmet on! There are a number of great short races out there that encourage beginners and I find that the culture of triathlons is extremely supportive of all levels, so come and join us! –Natalie Dainer

Read more

Suzuki Brumby’s leading by example at the top level of Australian cycling

Suzuki Brumby 2One of my personal mandates for this blog is to promote women’s cycling at all levels so this week it’s the top ends turn. Recently I caught up with Megan O’Neill Johnston who the Assistant Manager and Head Soigneur for the Canberra-based Suzuki Brumby’s women’s cycling team who had some very interesting insights into how a cycling team runs…..

Q: How long has the team been going?

Suzuki Brumby’s is a Canberra based team that started in 2008 and originally fielded both a men’s and women’s National Road Series (NRS) team, however in 2014 we are an all-female affair.

Q: How many members do you currently have?

We currently have 9 cyclists in the team; 7 who are based in Canberra, 1 in Victoria and 1 in NSW. We are all really close, not only as team mates, but as friends and I think this contributes significantly to the success and character of the team. There is a lot of comradeship and support for each other which I think is imperative in such a mentally tough sport.

Read more

Women’s product development at Specialized HQ

Erin in action, testing products

Erin in action, testing products

As you may have read in my previous post I attended the Specialized dealer launch on the Gold Coast last month and enjoyed seeing and hearing about the emphasis being put on women’s products by Specialized. It got me thinking about how the products are actually developed. I’ve often heard other people from Specialized talking about the women’s product development team so I decided to delve deeper and find out how it all works.

Erin Sprague who heads up the women’s product development team in California was kind enough to chat with me last week via Skype. Erin heads up a team of six including three product managers who oversee the categories of mountain, road and fitness/family plus a product marketing specialist and one other. This team then works with other specialists like engineers, designers and those who focus on product development.

All Specialized’s women’s products are developed by the team of women who have a variety of backgrounds like triathlon, road, mountain, so that they can really understand the requirements of each of these segments.

Read more

WoO Hoo – Women of Oatley sharing their love of cycling

WOO 3 smallIn May 2010, when Lynda Behan suggested that she and a friend get on their bikes and start a regular ride together, she had no idea that four years later she’d have 35 women who wanted to tag along, and Women of Oatley (WoO) would be born.

I met Lynda at a women’s cycling discussion a couple of months ago and I was impressed by her passion and enthusiasm for encouraging other women to start riding.

Back in 2010 it was her husband that encouraged her to start riding, because he rode with a local recreational riding group and thought Lynda should join him. Lynda took it one step further and invited her friend to join her on a ride around a local park and then gradually, two by two, other women began to join them.

Oatley is a southern suburb of Sydney and Lynda and others are very fortunate to have a local park/reserve with a great cycle track but they’ve since ventured much further than their local area.

Read more

So you want to ride your first Gong ride

My first Gong ride - 2008

My first Gong ride – 2008

The wonderful Tina McCarthy from Wheel Women recently visited Sydney and ran a bike skills course and asked me along on the Sunday morning. It was great interacting with a great group of female cyclists. One of the questions I was asked was “Have you got any tips for riding the Gong ride?” and I most certainly do.

For those of you who are not Sydneysiders the Gong Ride is Sydney’s biggest mass participation bike ride which is held on the first Sunday of November each year. The ride which has been going for 32 years, is a scenic route from Sydney to Wollongong following the coastline. It’s an awesome event and I’ve participated every year since I’ve been riding, a total of six times. So here’s my tips for enjoying the picturesque Gong ride. These tips apply equally to any mass participation ride that might be held in your home town:

Get your entry in

Don’t procrastinate any longer. If you enter the event you’ve made a commitment to yourself and to others. If you put it off until you get closer to the date you’ll continue to make excuses. You’ll also find that rides like the Gong ride have a restriction of entry numbers and may sell out.

Read more

The high stakes of Women’s Keirin racing in Japan

If you’ve ever been to watch a track cycling event you’ve probably watched a very unusual race called the Keirin. I’ve always enjoyed it and for a number of years I’ve been aware that it’s a big sport in Japan where it was developed. Men’s Keirin racing is very popular but women are also involved and it’s growing. Here’s a few insights based on some research I undertook:

Keirin is a track cycling race where between six to nine riders race over about 2 km around a velodrome. It is a relatively new Olympic event, first raced by the men in 2000 and the women in 2012. Keirin has been a big part of Japanese culture since it was introduced in 1948 as an initiative to rebuild after the war. The race starts with a pace setter (typically a motorised “derny”) who starts slowly but gradually increases the speed until peeling off with about 600 or 700 metres left to race. Usually the riders are travelling at about 50 km/hour by this point and have hopefully manoeuvered into their favoured position. Once the “derny” is gone the race is in full flight and the riders fight to take line honours.

The women follow international competition rules in Japan to keep things safer: while the men are renowned for shoulder barging and head butting through their racing, Girl’s Keirin is a bit more ladylike. The women use colourful disc wheels and tri-spokes provided by the JKA –the same colour wheels as the lane colour they draw.

Read more

Taking baby steps to start mountain biking

Kimmy Fasani with Specialized, March 2013.If you’re a regular reader of this blog you’ll know that I’m a dedicated road bike rider and have almost zero experience on a mountain bike. So I was pretty nervous when I was invited to test a few mountain bikes at the recent Specialized 2015 dealer launch.

I was very fortunate that I had some awesome mountain bikes to trial. The main one I rode was the brand new S-Works Era, a women’s dual suspension 29er which is an amazing bike but I definitely felt I didn’t do it justice. I was lucky enough to ride with an experienced mountain biker, Kate who owns the Specialized store in Batemans Bay. Kate was as great tutor and taught me to take baby steps rather than leap right in.

So I thought it would be useful if I shared a few things I learnt from her. I’ve also borrowed a few ideas from US mountain bike enthusiast Selene Yeager who has some great tips in her book Every Woman’s Guide to Cycling.

Read more

« Older Entries