Tips for finding a female friendly cycling club

The women of KPCC

The women of KPCC

Joining a cycling club is a great way to meet other cyclists and to step up from being a ‘Sunday’ recreational cyclist to that next level. Traditionally they have been primarily focused on racing rather than just riding but they are beginning to reinvent themselves as the popularity of cycling grows to accommodate riders who don’t necessarily want to race, and to welcome women who have not always been attracted to clubs.

When you join a cycling club in Australia you are actually signing up as a member of Cycling Australia which gives you a number of other benefits including public liability and personal accident insurance. On the Cycling Australia website under membership you can search cycling clubs in your area within a 5 km, 10 km, 25 km or 100 km radius, giving you a good shortlist depending on how far afield you are willing to go.

Once you have a shortlist you need to decide what your priorities are to find out what each club can offer you. You could consider criteria like location, whether skills training is offered, what training rides are available, the number of female members and the support given to female riders, racing opportunities for women, and of course what social activities are included.

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Women Who Cycle’s 2014 Christmas Gift Guide

Every year I compile a Christmas gift list of things I like, and that I think other female road cyclists will like as well. So here’s the 2014 edition.

Ginger & French mug

Bicycle mugThese fine bone china mugs from England are not cheap but they are a cut above you typical coffee mug. I’ve already placed my order and will enjoy a lovely cup of tea from mine when they arrive.

Gold bicycle pendant

NecklaceI already have one of these gold road bike pendants and always get comments about how nice it is and how appropriate it is for me to wear it. Once again it’s not cheap but it’s a quality item.

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Chloe Hosking living the cycling dream

Chloe Hosking 7

Chloe taking the win at Omloop van Borsele © sportfoto.nl

Last week I had the pleasure of interviewing Aussie pro cyclist Chloe Hosking over the phone. Chloe has returned home to Canberra for the summer season where her training program continues, as well as her university studies in communication.

Chloe has just completed two pretty successful years with Norwegian team Hitec. Her 2014 season began with a stage victory at the Mitchelton Bay Crits, and continued with impressive results in Europe including the EPZ Omloop van Borsele and a stage of the Lotto-Belisol Belgium Tour.

But despite her successes Hitec told her that they wouldn’t be renewing her contract for 2015. Chloe wasn’t too disappointed because she says she was ready to move but when discussions with Orica-AIS fell over at the final hurdle she was feeling a little anxious about her future. She made contact with a number of teams and found a great fit with Wiggle Honda where she’s signed up for the 2015 season. There she’ll be reunited with her friends Elisa Longo Borghini and Audrey Cordon and will enjoy racing again with Emilia Fahlin.

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The moving of the deckchairs in women’s pro cycling

Amanda Spratt racing La Course in 2014

Amanda Spratt racing La Course in 2014

It’s that time of year when professional cyclists announce their team transfers for the following year. We can all read plenty about the high profile male riders but there’s not so much written about the women. So here’s a list of some of the higher profile Australian female pro road cyclists and their plans for 2015. Please note that this is not a complete list of every Australian female rider who is registered as a professional, so please don’t been offended if you’re not on my list.

Tiffany Cromwell

Tiffany just won the Australian female road cyclist of the year award for 2014 and came fifth in the World Champs road race. She will stick with the same team next year but it’s undergone a makeover and will re-emerge as Velocio-SRAM. For the past three years it’s been known as Specialized-lululemon.

Nettie Edmondson

Nettie is making a shift in 2015 and is joining the Wiggle Honda team which is owned and run by fellow Aussie cyclist Rochelle Gilmore.

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The magic of the bike

Alice Hawkins on the campaign trail

Alice Hawkins on the campaign trail

I know it’s a big call, but I’d like to declare that the humble bicycle has magic powers. I’m sure any non cyclist reading this will think I’m a little strange, but those of you who have been mesmerised by bike riding, will be able to relate. For me, taking up road cycling six years ago has been life changing so I’ll declare it has magical powers. Here’s a few reasons why:

Turns introverts into social butterflies

I was riding with a woman called Ange recently who is a very new convert to road cycling. She confided that when she gets on her trusty road bike she changes from an introvert who usually shuns social interaction, to a woman who wants to chat with anyone else on a bike. She deliberately speeds up when she sees other groups of cyclists so she can have a chat. Evidence indeed of the magic powers.

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Focus on women’s bikes and accessories strong at Trek

Trek 4You may have read my blog post a couple of months ago about women’s product development at Specialized. I also made contact with a few other companies at the same time and so here’s the women’s development story from Trek. I would have preferred to have spoken to someone from Trek, instead here’s some Q&A via email from Emily Bremer who is based at Trek HQ in the US and among other roles is responsible for the marketing of women’s products.

 

 

How many people at Trek work on women’s product development? Are they all women?

Women’s specific product development at Trek is a group effort, and certainly not done just by women. From industrial designers, to engineers, to marketing, and everything in between, women’s product development across categories is a top priority, and I think this is really reflected in the quality of Trek products. Trek is a global company, so it’s really hard to pinpoint a specific number of people working on our women’s specific product. Both men and women work on all Trek and Bontrager products, regardless of riding category or gender.

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Cyclists need to lighten up on those arms and hands

ShouldersOne of my worst habits on the bike, and sadly there are a few, is to hold tension in my shoulders while I’m riding. It doesn’t matter how often I tell myself to relax my shoulders, arms and hands I still find myself stiffening up in this area which leads to soreness and ongoing issues with the muscles in my upper back. So I thought it would be useful to share a few tips I’ve found on the subject which obviously apply equally to men and women. I’ll also continue to focus on these tips myself!

Let it go – Consciously let go of the tension in your arms and shoulders by focusing on that part of your body while you are riding. I regularly check in with myself and literally tell myself to relax my shoulders. Shrugging every 15 minutes or so and relaxing your arms really helps relieve this stress.

 

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Yoga is the yin and cycling is the yang

Yoga - AngeloI was recently approached by a Sydney-based yoga/cycling enthusiast who has developed his own yoga classes just for cyclists called Pedal Stroke Yoga. As a fan of yoga I was intrigued by Angelo’s upcoming workshops so asked him a few questions about what’s behind it.

How can yoga benefit cyclists?

I believe that Yoga is the yin to the cycling yang. Both of these complimentary halves work together to create a ‘high performance’ version of you as a cyclist and also as a human being. My Pedal Stroke Yoga workshops are designed to put back what your cycling takes out. When you are in a Pedal Stroke Yoga class you are essentially performing a full service and maintenance on your body and mind, the same way you do on your bicycle. Your body will outlast that expensive carbon frame bike you own, so why not take the same care with your body that you do with your bike. That way when you do get back on your bike to race, or go on a ride, your body will perform to its maximum potential and maybe even beyond.

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Returning to riding after bub

Melinda Allen

Melinda Allen

Last year I wrote a post about riding while pregnant and I thought I should follow that up with one about returning to riding after giving birth. The most important thing to note is that every women is different and so everyone needs to make their own decisions about how much to cycle during pregnancy and after having a baby.

For the record, this is not a topic that I’m an expert on, because I have not completed any formal training in healthcare or fitness, and I’ve never been pregnant, but I’ve done some research and asked a number of women who have experienced it firsthand for their input.

When to start again?

Some of the women said they were back riding as early as two weeks but it also depended on the type of delivery. Alison Frendin in her article about returning to riding after baby points out that every woman is different – “natural, C-section, episiotomy or tearing? –Obviously if you had a rough time you aren’t going to be ready at six weeks. Still, stitches should be completely gone and C-section mums must wait double the six week period after having this “major surgery”! Even then, lifting or pulling heavy objects and doing any impact exercises is going to put a strain on your abdomen.”

If you want to read Alison’s entire article you’ll find it here.

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Cyclists beware of angry butcherbirds in Spring

The butcherbird wreaking havoc at Concord West

The butcherbird wreaking havoc at Concord West

Last year I wrote a post about Springtime bird attacks, and either I didn’t heed my own advice or the birds in my area are really bad this year, but last week I was attacked by a very aggressive butcherbird!

For those who don’t know about this little ‘terrier’ of a bird, it’s an Australian native and about half the size of a magpie and usually grey or black & white in colour. Since being attacked by one last week I’ve done a little research on these aggressive little so-and-sos.

As well as having a hook at the end of its beak for stabbing prey (as seen in the photograph), the butcherbird has been described as the Hannibal Lecter of the bird world. It gets its name because it impales its prey on thorns and tree forks. These skewers support victims as they are eaten, or stored for later consumption.

There’s a very aggressive butcherbird frequenting a well-worn cyclist route in my local area, right near Concord West train station and he’s drawn blood on many occasions (I say ‘he’ because it’s usually the male bird who defends the nest, not because I’m being sexist!). He got me from behind last week, clipping me on the chin with a his beak and drawing blood on three separate small cuts. And I’ve spoken to many, many others who’ve suffered the same fate.

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